Inspiration Along The Journey — Part 3

Don’t forget to read my other posts in My Yoga Journey.

AppleAs I’ve said before, I’m met some pretty amazing people along my yoga journey. First I talked about Adrian then I talked about Cerissa. In this post I will be talking about Wanna Ratta, better known as Apple.

In my last blog post, I talked about the yoga pose Salamba Kapotasana (pigeon pose), and how amazing it feels when I go into it. Apple is another great instructor. If I was to describe Apple in a word, that word would be strength. Apple brings strength to everything she does. She has a strength of character, a strength of personality and a strength of being. And during her classes she does a lot of things that help with building your core strength, which I need a lot of, lol.

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The Journey To Salamba Kapotasana

Don’t forget to read my other posts in My Yoga Journey.

I know it’s been a long time since I’ve posted in here, but things have been keeping me busy. My web site, The Northlands, just went through a very big upgrade and I’m still in the process of updating a lot of the stuff on there and adding some new things. Along with that we have re-opened an area on there called The Northlands Writers’ Guild, and I’m starting to write again. Just recently, Tracy and I just went to England for 10 days and we came back to threats of Bangkok flooding. Now parts of Bangkok did flood, but we’ve been lucky and the area that we live hasn’t flooded, but there is still the possibility that it could flood, but we’re hoping it won’t.
PigeonPigeon
Now on to better and more inspiring things. One of my favorite poses in yoga is Salamba Kapotasana or Pigeon Pose. I will do my best to try and describe this pose. First, you’re looking forward or up, your shoulders are square and relaxed with your heart open, your hips are square and facing forward, your tailbone is pointing down (not back), your rear leg is out straight behind you facing down, and your front leg is in front of your folded back at the knee. Now, if you bring your front heel closer to your hip, it’s a less intense pose and if your push your front heel out and away from your hips, it’s a more intense pose.

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